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dc.contributor.convenorD. Roebucken_AU
dc.contributor.authorYates, Kelleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Lizen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamsay, Sherylen_US
dc.contributor.editorBrendan Bartlett, Fiona Bryer, & Dick Roebucken_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:40:56Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:40:56Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.modified2008-12-16T07:02:20Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/2400
dc.description.abstractThe teaching profession has been described as "essentially conflictual天lemma-ridden and堣onstrained by factors beyond an individual teacher's control" (Cains & Brown, 1998, p. 97). Consistent with this perspective, it is not surprising that teachers often suffer from emotional exhaustion and stress. What may be surprising however are recent reports that teachers appear to be experiencing burnout much earlier in their careers than expected. Goddard and O'Brien (2003) discovered that teachers were reporting symptoms of burnout as early as in their first year of employment. This clearly has significant implications for teachers and the teaching profession in general and is an issue that needs to be addressed. The current study aims to examine how well Universities prepare their students for the teaching profession. Final year Primary Teaching students will be followed as they make the transition form University study to the workforce. Their perceived level of preparedness, their commitment to the profession, their expectations about the workforce, their teaching self-efficacy and their attribution style will all be examined as possible predictors of emotional exhaustion in their first year of teaching. This paper examines the results of the first stage of data collection.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent249307 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of Cognition, Language, and Special Education, Griffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof0en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameInternational Conference on Cognition, Language and Special Education (2nd)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleEducating: Weaving research into practiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2004-12-03en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2004-12-05en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSurfers Paradise, Australiaen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380108en_US
dc.titleStudent teacher perceptions of preparedness for teaching.en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2004. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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