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dc.contributor.authorMackerras, Colin
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:05:07Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:05:07Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.date.modified2011-04-28T07:08:23Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/24022
dc.description.abstractThe paper analyses Sino-Australian relations over the period 2006 in 2008 in terms of economics, strategy and culture. It concludes that harmonious bilateral relations are quite compatible with the diverse nature of the two countries, but that Australian government cultural enthusiasm for China helps rather than hinders. Since the 10th Australian Studies Conference in China in July 2006, Australia has experienced a change of government from the John Howard-led Coalition to the Kevin Rudd-led Australian Labor Party. Under Howard Australia enjoyed very good relations with China, mainly based on economics. Unlike Howard, Rudd is genuinely interested in and likes China, even to the extent of learning Chinese and gaining some expertise about the country. In many ways relations are unaffected by the change of government. Trade continues as before, cementing relations. There are, however, several respects impacting on relations. For instance, Chinese investment in Australia has gathered momentum arousing concern among some Australian economic nationalists. Although the American alliance will be just as important for Rudd as for Howard, his attitude on some major issues like Iraq and climate change is closer to Chinese policy and more distant from American, than Howard's. In cultural terms, Rudd has always been much more enthusiastic for Australians to know and understand Chinese culture than Howard. He was in the forefront of pushing for Chinese (and other Asian) language study in the 1990s and his policy speech just before the 24 November general election that brought him to office specifically promised more Asian-language study in the schools. On the other hand, Howard's government allowed an Asian languages and studies strategy in place before 1996 to disintegrate and formally discontinued funding to it in 2002. There are quite a few diversities between Australia and China under both governments, such as differences in population and culture, and these did not prevent harmonious relations under Howard. On the other hand, Rudd's greater enthusiasm for Chinese culture is more likely to help the bilateral relationship than hinder it.
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent122520 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNo data provided
dc.publisher.urihttp://inasa.org/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameThe Eleventh International Conference on Australian Studies in China
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleSino-Australian Relations, 2006 to 2008: A Case Study of Diversity in Harmony
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2008-10-31
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2008-11-02
dc.relation.ispartoflocationCentury Huatian Hotel, Beijing
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGovernment and Politics of Asia and the Pacific
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160606
dc.titleSino-Australian Relations, 2006 to 2008: A Case Study of Diversity in Harmony
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE2 - Conferences (Non Refereed)
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2008. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author.
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMackerras, Colin P.


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