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dc.contributor.convenorH. Creese, T. Aoyama, R. Roberts, School of Languages and Comparative Sten_AU
dc.contributor.authorStrachan, Glendaen_US
dc.contributor.authorVo, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.editorH. Creese, T. Aoyama, R. Robertsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:28:31Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:28:31Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-06-23T05:32:15Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/24285
dc.description.abstractSince 1986, Vietnam has embarked on a comprehensive economic reform, known as Doi Moi, to liberalise the economy from a socialist centrally planned system to a more market oriented one. With the dismantling of social support provisions for women, the Doi Moi has deteriorated gender equality in Vietnam. Yet many trends post Doi Moi, such as expanded work opportunities and increased mobility, have been positive. This paper examines gender-based differences in employment for white-collar employees in state owned enterprises in the steel industry. It focuses on two issues: the different social expectations for women and men in relation to family care work and paid employment, and the impact this has on women's workforce participation; and organisational policies and organisational culture that present difficulties for women's employment and career advancement. This study offers evidence that Vietnamese women managers carry a double burden of responsibilities, attempting to combine their role as another breadwinner with the traditional role of daughter, wife and mother. Stereotypical perceptions of women's lack of managerial skills are widely held by both men and women. Even though the Vietnamese Government has successfully created an institutional context for the advancement of women's rights, its ability to influence gender relations and its capacity to promulgate equality has declined in the new economic system. Women's success is heavily reliant on individual will and commitment. Although some women have attained managerial and leadership positions, in general Vietnamese women still encounter challenges at work posed by the culture and traditions of society.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent106204 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Queenslanden_US
dc.publisher.placeSt Lucia, Qlden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.uq.edu.au/~jarrober/home.htmlen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameNinth International Women in Asia Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleWomen in Asia: Transition and Interchange: Conference Handbooken_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2008-09-29en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2008-10-01en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUniversity of Queensland, Brisbaneen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Resources Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150305en_US
dc.titleGender Equity in a Transforming Economyen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2008. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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