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dc.contributor.convenorRoberta Julian
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Malcolm
dc.contributor.editorRoberta Julian, Reannan Rottier and Rob White
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:14:02Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:14:02Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.date.modified2008-04-22T21:35:26Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/2441
dc.description.abstractPhysicists have suddenly found social networks. Triggered by the modelling of 'small world architecture' presented by Watts and Strogatz in Nature (June, 1998), physicists, computer scientists, and mathematicians have produce a flood of materials on social, ecological, biological and biochemical networks. They have generated working models of network dynamics and complex network simulations with many applications. Publicists in the field talk of a new, comprehensive 'science of networks' with the potential to supersede current social theories. In this paper I describe how social network analysts have, independently, developed simulation models of social networks. For the first time, these techniques allow us to generate the array of all possible networks of the size and density of an observed network. This allows empirical sociological researchers to identify features of an observed network that are unusual and, thus, make probabilistic assessments parallel to those of standard statistics. We illustrate this technique on an example network of interlocking company directorates in Australia. In conclusion we suggest how this methodology would develop for this example and reflect on the interests of sociology and complexity science in this area of work.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent102866 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherThe Australian Sociological Association (TASA)
dc.publisher.placeHobart
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.tasa.org.au/conference/2005/
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.tasa.org.au/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameTASA 2005 Conference: Community, Place, Change
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleTASA 2005 Conference: Community, Place, Change
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-12-05
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-12-08
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUniversity of Tasmania, Hobart
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370101
dc.titlePhysicists and sociological network modelling: New methodologies of social network analysis and theories of social structure
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2005. The attached file is reproduced here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to TASA website or contact the author.
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorAlexander, Malcolm L.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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