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dc.contributor.convenorMike Osborne, Jim Gallacher, Richard Edwardsen_AU
dc.contributor.authorWheelahan, Leesaen_US
dc.contributor.editorJoanne Caldwell ...et al.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:59:27Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:59:27Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2008-08-06T01:40:48Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://crll.gcal.ac.uk/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/2514
dc.description.abstractIn a recent paper, Ronald Barnett (2004) called for an 'ontological turn' in curriculum and pedagogy away from a focus on knowledge and skills to a 'pedagogy for human being', which seeks to develop the human qualities and dispositions needed to thrive in an uncertain future. He counter-poses his approach with the 'generic skills' approach, arguing that the latter is a cul-de-sac, because it is premised on certain and knowable skills to navigate an uncertain world. While agreeing with him that generic skills are a dead-end, this paper argues that a 'pedagogy for human being' must be contextualised by a vocation, which means that knowledge and skills are important because they help to develop the human qualities and dispositions sought by Barnett. Unless the notion of vocation is used to ground Barnett's 'ontological turn' in the curriculum, the danger is that the attributes and dispositions he seeks will result in disconnected and fragmented identities, which find expression in market oriented capacities and patterns of consumption (Bernstein, 2000), rather than an intrinsic sense of inner calling, or (as sought by Barnett) an authentic self. I use critical realism to critique Barnett's analysis, draw on Bernstein (2000) to argue against decontextualised notions of 'trainability', offer Dewey's (1966 (1916)) notion of a vocation as an alternative, and Young (2003) to argue for an alternative model of qualifications and curriculum.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent45498 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCentre for Research in Lifelong Learningen_US
dc.publisher.placeScotlanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://crll.gcal.ac.uk/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameWhat a Difference a Pedagogy Makes: Researching Lifelong Learning and TeachingWhat a Difference a Peen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleWhat a Difference a Pedagogy Makes: Researching Lifelong Learning and Teachingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-06-24en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-06-26en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUniversity of Stirlingen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330103en_US
dc.titleWhat Kind of Curriculum, Pedagogy & Qualifications Do We Need for an Uncertain Future?en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2005. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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