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dc.contributor.authorD. Mawdsley, Ralphen_US
dc.contributor.authorCumming, Joyen_US
dc.contributor.editorJoy Cumming & Elizabeth Dicksonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:50:15Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:50:15Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2010-01-20T06:38:54Z
dc.identifier.issn13277634en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/25521
dc.description.abstractConsiderable education legislation is passed in both the United States of America and Australia, and other nations, to govern educational activities at state and federal levels. In the US, educational challenges proliferate in the courts and students and parents seek for appropriate educational provision or compensation. In Australia, while actions are not common, a considerable case law on a range of matters is in existence, and is growing. This article examines these contexts to argue that education law should be recognised as a legal field, and that judicial determinations should recognise parameters of education law in decision-making. At present, in both nations, education law challenges are sited within other recognised areas of law, such as constitutional law, administrative law, employment law, and discrimination law. However, increasingly, the authors argue, these fields, and the legal tests within do not seem to provide satisfactory legal resolution to education issues. For example, applying a business model of vicarious liability to a school setting seems to beg the question of the nature of schools and compulsory education provision and school attendance for young children.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent8357583 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherANZELAen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane, AUSen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.anzela.edu.au/index.phpen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto20en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralia & New Zealand Journal of Law & Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw and Legal Studies not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode189999en_US
dc.titleThe origins and development of education law as a separate field of law in the United States and Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Australia & New Zealand Education Law Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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