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dc.contributor.authorOwen, Suzzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBatzloff, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorChehrehasa, Fatemehen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeedeniya, Adrianen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasart Quintero, Yvethen_US
dc.contributor.authorLogue, Carie-Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHirst, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorPeak, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorMackay-Sim, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeacham, Iforen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:19:20Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:19:20Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-06-03T09:25:05Z
dc.identifier.issn00221899en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/599210en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/25756
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is generally considered to be acquired via inhalation of dust or water droplets from the environment. In this study, we show that infection of the nasal mucosa is potentially an important portal of entry in melioidosis. METHODS: After intranasal inoculation of mice, infection was monitored by bioluminescence imaging and by immunohistological analysis of coronal sections. The bacterial loads in organ and tissue specimens were also monitored. RESULTS: Bioluminescence imaging showed colonization and replication in the nasal cavity, including the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Analysis of coronal sections and immunofluorescence microscopy further demonstrated the presence of infection in the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory epithelium (including associated nerve bundles), as well as in the NALT. Of significance, the olfactory epithelium and the brain were rapidly infected before bacteria were detected in blood, and a capsule-deficient mutant infected the brain without significantly infecting blood. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the olfactory nerve is the route of entry into the brain and that this route of entry may be paralleled in cases of human neurologic melioidosis. This study focuses attention on the upper respiratory tract as a portal of entry, specifically focusing on NALT as a route for the development of systemic infection via the bloodstream and on the olfactory epithelium as a direct route to the brain.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent829210 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/toc/jid/currenten_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1761en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1770en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume199en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInfectious Agentsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCentral Nervous Systemen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060502en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110903en_US
dc.titleNasal-associated lymphoid tissue and olfactory epithelium as portals of entry for Burkholderia pseudomallei in murine melioidosisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 by University of Chicago Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in The Journal of Geology. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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