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dc.contributor.authorRane, Halimen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdalla, Mohamaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:33:04Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:33:04Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-21T05:34:07Z
dc.identifier.issn08102686en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.halimrane.com/publications.htmlen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/26153
dc.description.abstractFor the vast majority of Australians, the mass media are a primary source of information about Islam and Muslims. The results of a telephone survey conducted with a sample of 500 people in Queensland indicate that the media have not facilitated a better understanding of Islam or its adherents. Rather, for many people reliant on the media for information, an understanding of "mass media Islam" has emerged. Due to a media tendency to focus on the extremes of Islam rather than the moderate mainstream, this understanding is more consistent with a constructed media version of Islam than with reality. Certain media sources were found to be more strongly associated with this process of image construction than others. The study also found that in spite of having limited knowledge of Islam and a reliance on the media for information, most respondents are generally accepting of Muslims as part of Australian society and do not perceive them as a threat to the country. Part of the explanation is that almost two-thirds of those surveyed recognise media representations of Islam and Muslims as a negative construction (biased, unfair, inaccurate or ill-informed) rather than an accurate, objective or fair representation. The study concludes that in spite of the media being a primary source of information, the potential for pejorative representations of Muslims to generate negative public opinion is limited to a minority of the population.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJournalism Education Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.jea.org.au/index.htmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom39en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto49en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journalism Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume30en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode400104en_US
dc.titleMass Media Islam: the impact of media imagery on public opinionen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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