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dc.contributor.authorLin, Francesen_US
dc.contributor.authorSt John, Winsomeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcVeigh, Carolen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:04:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:04:03Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-21T05:34:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0966-0429en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2834.2008.00914.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/26154
dc.description.abstractAim: The aim of this study was to examine the level of burnout and factors that contribute to burnout in hospital nurses in the People's Republic of China. Background While burnout among hospital nurses has been widely researched in western countries, little research has investigated burnout among hospital nurses in China. Method: A translated version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey was used to measure burnout in 249 randomly selected nurses from various wards of a large teaching hospital in Beijing, China. Questionnaire packs were sent to the hospital wards where selected nurses worked. One hundred and twenty-eight nurses returned the completed questionnaire. The response rate was 51%. Results: The results showed moderate levels of Emotional Exhaustion and Personal Accomplishment, and low levels of Depersonalization. Age, years of experience and professional title had a significant positive relationship with Emotional Exhaustion and Personal Accomplishment. Older, married nurses with more personal responsibilities and in a more senior position experienced higher levels of Emotional Exhaustion. Conclusion: The findings suggest that burnout is a significant issue for nurses in China. Implications for nursing management. The results of this study indicate that working environment factors such as relationships with coworkers and managers may contribute to or mitigate burnout. There is a need to address personal and professional support, life-work balance, personal accomplishment and educational programmes to reduce burnout in nurses working in China.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent131322 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118535815/homeen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom294en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto301en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Nursing Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111099en_US
dc.titleBurnout among hospital nurses in Chinaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at www.interscience.wiley.comen_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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