Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLin, Jin-Dingen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoh, Ching-Huien_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, Chia-Imen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, Yuan-Tingen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Hsueh-Linen_US
dc.contributor.authorYen, Chia-Fengen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Shang-Weien_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Lan-Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, Cordiaen_US
dc.contributor.editorPao-Luh Taoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:08:14Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:08:14Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2011-05-05T07:58:29Z
dc.identifier.issn10114564en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://jms.ndmctsgh.edu.tw/fdarticlee%5C2806227.pdfen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/26366
dc.description.abstractBackground: The aims of the analysis were to describe the prevalence and types of adverse effects on occupational health of hospital personnel, and to examine their relationship to the hospital working environment. Methods: Data were analyzed from a 2002 pilot project "Taiwan Hospital Health Promotion Program: A Medical Center Initiative". The study sample consisted of 649 hospital personnel (response rate of 81.3%) in Taipei. The effects of three different health-affecting aspects of the working environment-physical environment, exposure to chemical agents, and usage of protective devices-were used as predictive variables for the perception of adverse health effects in hospital personnel. Results: 73.1% of hospital personnel reported adverse occupational health effects within one year. The main types of discomfort reported were (prevalence): neck/upper shoulder pain (39.9%), fatigue (38.9%), lower back pain (27.7%), headache (26.9%), eye discomfort (24.9%), throat irritation (22.3%), wrist discomfort (19.3%), nose discomfort (18.1%), and varicose veins (10.9%). A multiple logical regression model indicated that those personnel who perceived that they were exposed to health-affecting physical environments were more likely to perceive adverse health effects (OR = 3.11, 95% CI = 2.01-4.82) than those who did not consider that they were exposed to such physical environments. Conclusions: The hospital should adjust the provisional health and safety programs and strategies to the specific context and conditions of the physical environment of the hospital to improve the health and well-being of hospital personnel.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent139274 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNational Defense Medical Centeren_US
dc.publisher.placeTaiwanen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://jms.ndmctsgh.edu.tw/english/index.aspen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom227en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto232en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Medical Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321201en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321216en_US
dc.titlePerceived Adverse Occupational Health Effects in Hospital Personnel: An Exploration of the Effects of the Workplace Environmenten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 National Defense Medical Center. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record