Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcMeeken, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Gillianen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Kerri-Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarnett, Robinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:41:44Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:41:44Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-12-15T03:17:46Z
dc.identifier.issn00049514en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/26594
dc.description.abstractQuestions: Have student numbers (ie, intake and attrition) changed since the introduction of graduate entry-level physiotherapy courses in Australian universities? What is the impact of any changes in student numbers on university funding? What is the impact of any changes in student numbers on the workforce? Have student characteristics (ie, gender, country of origin, background) changed? Design: Demographic study of 2003 graduates, 2004 student intake, and estimated 2007 student intake. Participants: Eleven Schools of Physiotherapy in Australia. Results: In 2003, 836 new physiotherapists graduated, and in 2004, 1108 students commenced with the percentage of graduate-entry Masters and international students increasing. Compared to the overall average 25% attrition rate of students from university, the rate for physiotherapy students was less than 5%; the funding formula thus underestimates physiotherapy student numbers across the years of the courses. While it remains the case that in undergraduate and graduate-entry programs most physiotherapy students are female, a greater proportion of males are entering graduate-entry Masters programs than undergraduate courses. International student numbers are increasing in line with trends across the sector, but representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in physiotherapy courses was lower than within universities generally. Conclusions: The marked overall increase in student numbers and greater retention rate in the graduate entry-level courses puts physiotherapy at a disadvantage in relation to Department of Education, Science and Training student funding. While the substantial increase in new physiotherapists may serve to ease workforce demands in the short term, significant pressure on physiotherapy academics and clinical educators was evident.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent204664 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Physiotherapy Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://ajp.physiotherapy.asn.au/AJP/vol_54/1/volume54_number1.cfmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom65en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto71en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Physiotherapyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume54en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.titleAustralian physiotherapy student intake is increasing and attrition remains lower than the university average: a demographic studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Australian Physiotherapy Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link to access the publisher's website.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record