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dc.contributor.authorBegum, Gulshanaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorCunliffe, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:16:29Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:16:29Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2010-10-12T06:56:08Z
dc.identifier.issn1526484Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/26833
dc.description.abstractHigh-intensity exercise leads to reductions in muscle substrates (ATP, PCr6, and glycogen) and a subsequent accumulation of metabolites (ADP, P, H(+), and Mg(+)) with a possible increase in free radical production. These factors independently and collectively have deleterious effects on muscle, with significant repercussions on high-intensity performance or training sessions. The effect of carnosine on overcoming muscle fatigue appears to be related to its ability to buffer the increased H(+) concentration following high-intensity work. Carnosine, however, has other roles such as an antioxidant, a metal chelator, a Ca(2+) and enzyme regulator, an inhibitor of protein glycosylation and protein-protein cross-linking. To date7comma; only 1 study has investigated the effects of carnosine supplementation (not in pure form) on exercise performance in human subjects and found no improvement in repetitive high-intensity work. Much data has come from in vitro work on animal skeletal muscle fibers or other components of muscle contractile mechanisms. Thus further research needs to be carried out on humans to provide additional understanding on the effects of carnosine in vivo.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics Publishers, Inc.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUSAen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://journals.humankinetics.com/IJSNEMen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom493en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto514en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolismen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321401en_US
dc.titlePhysiological role of carnosine in contracting muscleen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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