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dc.contributor.authorCreedy, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Clark, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorShaban, Ramonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T18:42:22Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T18:42:22Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.date.modified2013-07-30T23:21:39Z
dc.identifier.issn14474999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/26867
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Paramedics and other emergency health workers are exposed to infectious disease particularly when undertaking exposure-prone procedures as a component of their everyday practice. This study examined paramedic knowledge of infectious disease aetiology and transmission in the pre-hospital care environment. Methods A mail survey of paramedics from an Australian ambulance service (n=2274) was conducted. Results With a response rate of 55.3% (1258/2274), the study demonstrated that paramedic knowledge of infectious disease aetiology and modes of transmission was poor. Of the 25 infectious diseases included in the survey, only three aetiological agents were correctly identified by at least 80% of respondents. The most accurate responses for aetiology of individual infectious diseases were for HIV/AIDS (91.4%), influenza (87.4%), and hepatitis B (85.7%). Poorest results were observed for pertussis, infectious mononucleosis, leprosy, dengue fever, Japanese B encephalitis and vancomycin resistant enterococcus (VRE), all with less than half the sample providing a correct response. Modes of transmission of significant infectious diseases were also assessed. Most accurate responses were found for HIV/AIDS (85.8%), salmonella (81.9%) and influenza (80.1%). Poorest results were observed for infectious mononucleosis, diphtheria, shigella, Japanese B encephalitis, vancomycin resistant enterococcus, meningococcal meningitis, rubella and infectious mononucleosis, with less than a third of the sample providing a correct response. Conclusions Results suggest that knowledge of aetiology and transmission of infectious disease is generally poor amongst paramedics. A comprehensive in-service education infection control programs for paramedics with emphasis on infectious disease aetiology and transmission is recommended.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent239875 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonash Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourne, VIC, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://ro.ecu.edu.au/jephc/vol1/iss3/10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3-4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Emergency Primary Health Careen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume1en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320000en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321202en_US
dc.titleParamedic knowledge of infectious disease aetiology and transmission in an Australian Emergency Medical Systemen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.description.notepublicPagination is not for citation purposes. Article has been allocated the number: 990046en_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2003. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the publisher’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2003
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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