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dc.contributor.authorS. Catts, Vibekeen_US
dc.contributor.authorAl-Menhali, Nouraen_US
dc.contributor.authorH. J. Burne, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorColditz, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Coulson, Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T14:54:12Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T14:54:12Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-30T05:24:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0953816Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1460-9568.2008.06390.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/26983
dc.description.abstractAlthough changes to neural circuitry are believed to underlie behavioural characteristics mediated by the hippocampus, the contribution of neurogenesis to this process remains controversial. This is partially because the molecular regulators of neurogenesis remain to be fully elucidated, and experiments generically preventing neurogenesis have, for the most part, depended on paradigms involving irradiation. Here we show that mice lacking the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR-/-) have 25% fewer neuroblasts and 50% fewer newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus, coincident with increased rates of cell death of newly born cells and a significantly smaller granular cell layer and dentate gyrus, than those of p75NTR+/+ mice. Whereas p75NTR-/- mice had increased latency to feed in a novelty-suppressed feeding paradigm they had increased mobility in another test of "depression", the tail-suspension test. p75NTR-/- mice also had subtle behavioural impairment in Morris water maze tasks compared to wild-type animals. No difference between genotypes was found in relation to anxiety or exploration behaviour based on the elevated-plus maze, light-dark, hole-board, T-maze or forced-swim tests. Overall, this study demonstrates that p75NTR is an important regulator of hippocampal neurogenesis, with concomitant effects on associated behaviours. However, the behavioural attributes of the p75NTR-/- mice may be better explained by altered circuitry driven by the loss of p75NTR in the basal forebrain, rather than direct changes to neurogenesis.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118542297/homeen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom883en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto892en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode270502en_US
dc.titleThe p75 neurotrophin receptor regulates hippocampal neurogenesis and related behavioursen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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