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dc.contributor.authorW. Wardell-Johnson, Grant
dc.contributor.authorE. Lawson, Ben
dc.contributor.authorCoutts, Bob
dc.contributor.editorHarry F. Recher
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:59:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:59:03Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.modified2009-12-07T03:37:48Z
dc.identifier.issn10382097
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/27138
dc.description.abstractThe recognition and effective portrayal of floristic heterogeneity is a complex issue for land classification. This study in Toohey Forest, south-east Queensland, examines the effects of mapping scale and environmental variables on a floristically heterogeneous area. Current Version 4.1 regional ecosystem mapping at 1:100 000 scale maps Toohey Forest as a single regional ecosystem unit "12.11.5", described as an "open forest complex with Corymbia citriodora, Eucalyptus siderophloia, E. major on metamorphics ᠩnterbedded volcanics". Plant taxa data from 50, 20 x 20 m sites comprising 247 native vascular plant taxa were collected, along with data for 17 environmental variables and 10 species richness categories. A priori site groupings of 1:12 500 scale vegetation mapping and a geomorphic classifications of the area were examined using cluster analysis (UPGMA, Bray-Curtis Metric, ߠ= -0.1) and ordination (SSH MDS), Biplots of several variables (shrub species richness, total species richness, per cent rock cover, CEC, carbon and phosphorus) were significantly (P < 0,05) correlated with the ordination axes derived from each of the two strata levels and the total taxa, for both geomorphological and'vegetation mapping. Several variables (shrUb, vine, woody and introduced species richness, and carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, pH and CEC) varied significantly (P < 0.05) across both geomorphic categories and 1:12 500 scale vegetation community mapping. The ongoing reduction in regional ecosystem mapping scale, centred on the use of fine-scale geomorphology mapping, is likely to improve the representation of floristic patterns in heterogeneous environments.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSurrey Beatty & Sons
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://pcb.murdoch.edu.au/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom47
dc.relation.ispartofpageto59
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPacific Conservation Biology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLandscape Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050104
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.titleAre regional ecosystems compatible with floristic heterogeneity? A case study from Toohey Forest, south-east Queensland, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCoutts, Bob H.


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