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dc.contributor.convenorTim Raimonden_AU
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Lexen_US
dc.contributor.editorTim Raimond (Organising committee)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:19:45Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:19:45Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-06T05:45:48Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/tpdc/atrf_index.aspen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/2733
dc.description.abstractWith the 'sustainable city' now the dominant paradigm in Australian urban planning there is growing acceptance of transit oriented design (TOD) and New Urbanist concepts in planning policy and practice. Responding to increasingly extended journey-to-work and other trip movements, land use developers are being encouraged to ensure new development proposals create the potential for populations to make shorter journeys and to make mode shifts away from the private motor car and towards walking, cycling and public transport. Planning instruments are seeking increased land use mixing, densification around nodes, as well as a series of urban configurations and built form attributes that are considered conducive to sustainable travel behaviour. However, not all development proposals display these qualities - or at least not in sufficient measure to suggest they will be superior to previous generations of development - despite their marketing to local government and the community as sustainable settlements. It is difficult for local and state government decision-makers to cost-effectively determine just what potential specific development proposals have to decrease journey lengths for particular trip purposes, to encourage walking or cycling trips, or to support public transport operations. No decision-support tools are readily available to decision-makers to establish whether, say, either a new master planned community development on the urban fringe or a large mixed-use inner city redevelopment project actually provide the capacity for improved mode share for sustainable modes or for decreased journey lengths. The paper seeks to provide a framework for the development of such a decision-making tool at the local-area/community scaleen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent451833 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherATRFen_US
dc.publisher.placeSydney, NSWen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.patrec.org/atrf.aspxen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.patrec.org/web_docs/atrf/papers/2005/Burke%20&%20Brown%20(2005).pdfen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename28th Australasian Transport Research Forum:en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle28th Australasian Transport Research Forum: Transporting the Future - transport in a changing environmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-09-28en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-12-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSydney, New South Walesen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode319999en_US
dc.titleRating the Transport Sustainability of New Urban Developments: a starting point and ways forwarden_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 the Planning and Transport Research Centre (PATREC) on behalf of the Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF). The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.This publication is available online please use hypertext links.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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