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dc.contributor.authorMack, Florian
dc.contributor.authorMojon, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorBudtz-Jorgensen, Ejvind
dc.contributor.authorKocher, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorSplieth, Christian
dc.contributor.authorSchwahn, Christian
dc.contributor.authorBernhardt, Olaf
dc.contributor.authorGesch, Dietmar
dc.contributor.authorKordaÿ, Bernd
dc.contributor.authorJohn, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorBiffar, Reiner
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:16:34Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:16:34Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.issn07340664
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1741-2358.2003.00001.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/27522
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the oral health status of older adults living in northeastern Germany. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Representative samples of adults aged 60 years or older were examined as part of Study of the Health in Pomerania, a cross-sectional, population-based study. Data on 1446 subjects aged 60-79 years were evaluated for coronal caries using the decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) index, root caries using the root caries index (RCI), calculus, plaque, bleeding on probing, pocket depth and attachment loss. RESULTS: The prevalence of edentulousness varied from 16% in the 60-65-year-old group to 30% in the 75-79-year-old group, whereas the median number of remaining natural teeth per subject varied from 14 in the youngest age group (60-65 years) to one in the oldest (75-79 years). Among subjects aged 60-69 years, a quarter (26%) of the teeth examined had coronal restoration against 17% in the oldest age group (70-79 years). Coronal caries was found in 2% of the teeth in both age groups. Among teeth with gingival recession, 6% had fillings on root surfaces and 2% had root caries, irrespective of age. In all, 11% of the subjects had at least one untreated coronal lesion and 27% had at least one untreated root caries lesion. Plaque score, calculus score and bleeding on probing were higher in the oldest age group (70-79 years). The prevalence of periodontal disease expressed as the presence of at least one periodontal pocket of 4 mm and more, was higher in men and among the younger subjects (men aged 60-69 years: 85% vs. 71% in 70-79-year-old men; women aged 60-69 years: 71% vs. 62% in 70-79-year-olds). The prevalence of attachment loss of 3 mm or more followed a similar pattern. CONCLUSIONS: It seems therefore that in this population, the major oral health concern is related to caries and the small number of teeth retained among the dentate subjects.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Munksgaard
dc.publisher.placeDenmark
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom27
dc.relation.ispartofpageto36
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGerodontology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDentistry
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1105
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleCaries and periodontal disease of the elderly in Pomerania, Germany: results of the Study of Health in Pomerania
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2015-05-12T05:11:39Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMack, Florian


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