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dc.contributor.authorPrzyborski, JM
dc.contributor.authorBartels, K
dc.contributor.authorLanzer, M
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, KT
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:57:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:57:42Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.date.modified2009-12-21T03:17:15Z
dc.identifier.issn0932-0113
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00436-003-0874-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/27843
dc.description.abstractHistones are abundant nuclear core proteins that are present in all eukararyotes and are responsible for linking chromosomes and packaging them into tight chromatin aggregates. The histone H2A, H2B, and H3 genes and a partial sequence of the histone H4 gene from Plasmodium falciparum have been previously identified and share a high level of nucleotide sequence identity. In this study, we compare the histone H4 sequence of the human malaria P. falciparum with the sequences of two mouse malarias, Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium yoelii, revealing at least 91% identity at the nucleotide level and 100% conservation at the amino acid level. Furthermore, we show the P. falciparum histone H4 is developmentally transcribed in late stage asexual parasites, completing the transcription profile for the genes comprising the histone octamer of P. falciparum and adding support to suggestions that a novel histone mRNA control mechanism exists in this parasite.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.springer.com/biomed/medical+microbiology/journal/436
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom387
dc.relation.ispartofpageto389
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalParasitology Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume90
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchVeterinary sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical microbiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3107
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3009
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3207
dc.titleThe histone H4 gene of Plasmodium falciparum is developmentally transcribed in asexual parasites
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2003
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorAndrews, Katherine T.


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