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dc.contributor.authorHutchings, Aliceen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Hennesseyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:55:29Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:55:29Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn10345329en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/28075
dc.description.abstractPhishing is the use of fraudulent emails to obtain personal financial information from victims by posing as legitimate financial institutions or commerce sites. This exploratory study involved interviewing 104 participants, 50 of whom reported having received a phishing email. The theoretical foundation for this research is Routine Activity Theory, whereby crime is considered to be the consequence of the presence of a motivated offender, the presence of a suitable target, and the absence of a capable guardian. One of the findings arising from this research indicates that potential victims who undertake high levels of routine activities relating to computer use and internet banking use are more likely to be attacked by motivated offenders. However, it is proposed that high measures in these variables also act as protective factors against subsequent victimisation. Additionally, email filters, although they may be effective in blocking a large number of spam emails, are unable to differentiate legitimate emails from some phishing attacks.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent226061 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Criminology, University of Sydneyen_US
dc.publisher.placeSydneyen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.criminology.law.usyd.edu.au/journal/20_03.shtmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom433en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto451en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCurrent Issues in Criminal Justiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume20en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crimeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminological Theoriesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160204en_US
dc.titleRoutine Activity Theory and Phishing Victimisation: Who Gets Caught in the ‘Net’?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 jointly held by the Institute of Criminology and the author[s]. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-06-09T05:24:06Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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