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dc.contributor.authorSaha, Sukanta
dc.contributor.authorChant, David
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, John
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:58:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:58:03Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.modified2010-01-07T06:45:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0003990X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/28117
dc.description.abstractCONTEXT: Despite improvements in mental health services in recent decades, it is unclear whether the risk of mortality in schizophrenia has changed over time. OBJECTIVE: To explore the distribution of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for people with schizophrenia. DATA SOURCES: Broad search terms were used in MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Web of Science, and Google Scholar to identify all studies that investigated mortality in schizophrenia, published between January 1, 1980, and January 31, 2006. References were also identified from review articles, reference lists, and communication with authors. STUDY SELECTION: Population-based studies that reported primary data on deaths in people with schizophrenia. DATA EXTRACTION: Operationalized criteria were used to extract key study features and mortality data. DATA SYNTHESIS: We examined the distribution of SMRs and pooled selected estimates using random-effects meta-analysis. We identified 37 articles drawn from 25 different nations. The median SMR for all persons for all-cause mortality was 2.58 (10%-90% quantile, 1.18-5.76), with a corresponding random-effects pooled SMR of 2.50 (95% confidence interval, 2.18-2.43). No sex difference was detected. Suicide was associated with the highest SMR (12.86); however, most of the major causes-of-death categories were found to be elevated in people with schizophrenia. The SMRs for all-cause mortality have increased during recent decades (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: With respect to mortality, a substantial gap exists between the health of people with schizophrenia and the general community. This differential mortality gap has worsened in recent decades. In light of the potential for second-generation antipsychotic medications to further adversely influence mortality rates in the decades to come, optimizing the general health of people with schizophrenia warrants urgent attention.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association
dc.publisher.placeUSA
dc.publisher.urihttp://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1123
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1131
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalArchives of General Psychiatry
dc.relation.ispartofvolume64
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEpidemiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111706
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleA systematic review of mortality in schizophrenia: is the differential mortality gap worsening over time?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMcGrath, John J.


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