Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJeffery, Renéeen_US
dc.contributor.editorAnnika Bolton, Douglas Boulton, and Mireille Thorntonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:34:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:34:24Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2010-01-15T06:15:43Z
dc.identifier.issn03058298en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/03058298050340011101en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/28318
dc.description.abstractAlthough they have been a central feature of the disciplinary history of International Relations, little attention has been paid to the historical and epistemological implications of designating certain sets of writers and their ideas as belonging to particular `traditions of thought'. In light of this, this article is concerned with the theoretical conceptualisation of the term `tradition', its historical connotations, and its specific application to the history of IR scholarship. Relying heavily on Michael Oakeshott's philosophy of history, it argues not only that traditions are inherently `invented' phenomena but that the purposes for which they are invented - that is, whether they are historical or practical in orientation - is central to the analysis of their contents. Having established a theoretical understanding of `tradition', the article discusses the works of John G. Gunnell and Brian C. Schmidt as providing a number of useful ways in which traditions, thus conceived, might be analysed before demonstrating how this might be done in IR scholarship using the works of Martin Wight and Hedley Bull as a pertinent example. In doing so, the article also seeks to make a more general claim about the need for greater historical awareness in contemporary IR scholarship.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMillennium Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom57en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto84en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMillennium: Journal of International Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360105en_US
dc.titleTradition as Invention: The 'Traditions Tradition' and the History of Ideas in International Relationsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record