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dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Nicken_US
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorCallaghan, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Lingen_US
dc.contributor.editorLuka F. König and Jonas L. Weissen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:49:11Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:49:11Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-06T07:01:22Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781604568325en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=7528en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/28366
dc.description.abstractThe problem of a coastal aquifers forced by oscillations in an adjacent sea and/or estuary across a sloping boundary has recently received considerable theoretical attention. Despite such a wealth of mathematical advancements, stringent testing of the limitations of these models has yet to be undertaken. In all of the currently available analytical solutions it has been assumed that a single length scale is sufficient to account for both the amplitude decay rate and the rate of increase in phase lag (the wave speed) as the water table wave propagates landward. All of the available field and laboratory data however indicate that this is not the case. That is, the real part of the water table wave number (the amplitude decay rate) is not equal to the imaginary part (the rate of increase in the phase lag). In this chapter, the detailed laboratory measurements of Cartwright et al. [2004] are used to highlight the limitation of assuming a single length scale in these mathematical models. In a step towards overcoming this limitation, a new approximate analytical solution is derived which allows for two different length scales as observed in the available data. In the absence of the ability to accurately predict the water table wave number using basic aquifer parameters, all of the solutions are applied to the data using water table wave numbers estimated from the data. Accurately predicting the water table wave number based on measurable aquifer parameters remains a challenge.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent180695 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNova Science Publishersen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleGroundwater: Modelling, Management and Contaminationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter13en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom351en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto360en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEarth Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode049999en_US
dc.titleA note on the propagation of water table waves: dual length scale considerationsen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Nova Science Publishers Inc.. Use hypertext link for access to the publisher's website. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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