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dc.contributor.authorAitken, Leanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHendrikz, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDulhunty, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRudd, M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:22:35Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:22:35Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-06-30T06:44:50Z
dc.identifier.issn03009572en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resuscitation.2008.10.021en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/28581
dc.description.abstractAim This study aimed to determine factors linked to hypothermia (<35 é in Queensland trauma patients. The relationship of hypothermia with mortality, admission to intensive care and hospital length of stay was also explored. Methods A retrospective analysis of data from the Queensland Trauma Registry was undertaken, and included all patients admitted to hospital for =24 h during 2003 and 2004 with an injury severity score (ISS) > 15. Demographic, injury, environmental, care and clinical status factors were considered. Results A total of 2182 patients were included; 124 (5.7%) had hypothermia on admission to the definitive care hospital, while a further 156 (7.1%) developed hypothermia during hospitalisation. Factors associated with hypothermia on admission included winter, direct admission to a definitive care hospital, an ISS = 40, a Glasgow Coma Scale of 3 or ventilated and sedated, and hypotension on admission. Hypothermia on admission to the definitive care hospital was an independent predictor of mortality (odds ratio [OR] = 4.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.26-7.24) and hospital length of stay (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.22; 95% CI 1.03-1.43). Hypothermia during definitive care hospitalisation was independently associated with mortality (OR = 2.52; 95% CI 1.52-4.17), intensive care admission (OR = 1.73; 95% CI 1.20-2.93) and hospital length of stay (IRR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.02-1.36). Conclusions Trauma patients in a predominantly sub-tropical climate are at risk of accidental and endogenous hypothermia, with associated higher mortality and care requirements. Prevention of hypothermia is important for all severely injured patients.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent129305 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElservieren_US
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom217en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto223en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalResuscitationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume80en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003en_US
dc.titleHypothermia and associated outcomes in seriously injured trauma patients in a predominantly sub-tropical climateen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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