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dc.contributor.authorMcKinley, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorDracup, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoser, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorRiegel, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoering, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeischke, Hendrikaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAitken, Leanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Andreaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPelter, Micheleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:22:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:22:36Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-02T06:53:45Z
dc.identifier.issn00207489en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2009.01.012en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/28582
dc.description.abstractBackground Coronary heart disease (CHD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remain significant public health problems. The effect of ACS on mortality and morbidity is largely dependent on the time from symptom onset to the time of reperfusion, but patient delay in presenting for treatment is the main reason timely reperfusion is not received. Objectives We tested the effect of an education and counseling intervention on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about ACS symptoms and the appropriate response to symptoms, and identified patient characteristics associated with changes in knowledge, attitudes and beliefs over time. Methods We conducted a two-group randomized controlled trial in 3522 people with CHD. The intervention group received a 40 min, one-on-one education and counseling session. The control group received usual care. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs were measured at baseline, 3 and 12 months using the ACS Response Index and analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs scores increased significantly from baseline in the intervention group compared to the control group at 3 months, and these differences were sustained at 12 months (p = .0005 for all). Higher perceived control over cardiac illness was associated with more positive attitudes (p < .0005) and higher state anxiety was associated with lower levels of knowledge (p < .05), attitudes (p < .05) and beliefs (p < .0005). Conclusion A relatively short education and counseling intervention increased knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about ACS and response to ACS symptoms in individuals with CHD. Higher perceived control over cardiac illness was associated with more positive attitudes and higher state anxiety was associated with lower levels of knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about responding to the health threat of possible ACS.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent249446 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1037en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1046en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume46en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003en_US
dc.titleThe effect of a short one-on-one nursing intervention on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs related to response to acute coronary syndrome in people with coronary heart disease: A randomized controlled trialen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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