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dc.contributor.convenorKate Ui Ghallachoiren_AU
dc.contributor.authorSparks, Beverleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlendon, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Lynetteen_US
dc.contributor.editorKate Ui Ghallachoiren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:24:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:24:36Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-12-17T22:28:25Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://am2005.dit.ie/2005/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/2862
dc.description.abstractCorporate crises are becoming more frequent and devastating for companies with the resultant negative publicity often generating consumer anger towards the organization and its products. This negatively impacts consumer purchase intentions, sales, market share and stock prices. Despite the fact that the organizational message communicated following a crisis may be the only element under company control at the crisis outbreak to affect outcomes, few studies have investigated message effects on consumers. In this paper it is posited that, following a crisis-precipitating event, the best organizational message to reduce negative consumer reactions may be contingent upon the perceived cause of the crisis. That is, whether the crisis cause was internal or external to the company, and whether it is controllable or uncontrollable by the company, or an ambiguous combination of these. We argue, using Weiner's (1986, 1995) attribution theory, that consumers prefer messages that reflect the level of responsibility matching the crisis cause. A managerial decision tree is proposed to guide selection of message in the fast-paced decision-making period following a crisis. In doing so, we argue for the application of a new crisis typology based on causal conditions.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent89135 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAcademy of Marketingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUSen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.academyofmarketing.org/en_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://am2005.dit.ie/2005/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameThe 5th American Marketing Association/Academy of Marketing Joint Biennial Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleMarketing : Building business, shaping societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-07-05en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-07-07en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationDublin Institute of Technology, Irelanden_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode359999en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350206en_US
dc.titleCorporate Communication Effects and Crisis Type: Deriving managerial implications from theoryen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Managementen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2005. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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