Show simple item record

dc.contributor.convenorKay Harris
dc.contributor.authorBorchert, Martin
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Alison
dc.contributor.authorMacdonald, Debby
dc.contributor.authorTittel, Clare
dc.contributor.editorEmma Waygood
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:32:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:32:04Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-06-10T22:20:20Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.information-online.com.au/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/28702
dc.description.abstractAims Previous research on e-books has generally focused on business models and content delivery. This investigation, sponsored by the Queensland University Librarians Office of Cooperation (QULOC) aims to verify the quantitative and qualitative aspects of client awareness (or non-awareness), acceptance (or non-acceptance), usage levels (or non-use) and usage patterns of electronic books amongst students and staff at selected local universities. Results will inform library marketing, information literacy and collection development priorities. Methods Griffith University and University of Southern Queensland developed and made available online surveys via the institutions' library web sites and catalogues. Print versions of the survey were also distributed in libraries. Various e-book publishers were approached to provide deep log usage statistics. Responses to multiple choice and textual responses were quantitatively and qualitatively analysed. Results Over 2,200 students and staff responded and survey responses indicated a high level of awareness of ebooks amongst both staff and students, but relatively low usage, with the library catalogue being the major access point. Both students and staff generally liked ebooks and many had used ebooks in their subject area, but not within the context of resources for courses. Most preferred the library to purchase books in both print and electronic format with 24x7 access and ebook database searching being the most popular reasons for liking ebooks, while difficulty in reading from the screen for extended periods of time was the main reason for disliking ebooks. Few would read an entire ebook on the screen. Printing before reading was common. Usage log statistics from sample publishers were used to verify findings. Conclusion Results are discussed in the context of the available literature. Responses can be used in collection development to ensure ebooks are appropriately considered within collection development strategies and that ebooks are well received and used by clients.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent66273 bytes
dc.format.extent222101 bytes
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralian Library and Information Association (ALIA)
dc.publisher.placeSydney, Australia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.information-online.com.au
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameInformation Online 2009
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleInformation Online 2009
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-01-20
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-01-23
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSydney, Australia
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode280102
dc.titleA study on student and staff awareness, acceptance and usage of e-books at two Queensland universities
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyInformation Services, Information Services
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2009. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMacdonald, Debby
gro.griffith.authorBorchert, Martin


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record