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dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.editorChristine R. Veldeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:09:56Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:09:56Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-03-12T07:02:25Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781402087530en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4020-8754-7_3en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29142
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding what constitutes workplace competence stands a key concern for those who rely on and aim to develop and/or sustain that competence. Without a comprehensive understanding of this competence, it is difficult to advise individuals, enterprises, and governments how they should, respectively, plan their development throughout working life, manage the continuity of their workforce's skills, and organise how education systems can prepare and further develop individuals' capacities for work. Yet apprehending what constitutes workplace competence is not so easily undertaken. Rather than being uniform across an occupation or even nationally consistent, competence is shaped by situational factors, emerging technologies, specific occupational requirements, and the capacities of those who enact those requirements. Moreover, both the requirements for performance and personal capacities are dynamic, being shaped and remade by workers in response to the changing and particular demands of work performance. Yet, ultimately, competence at work is something enacted: a performance and judgements about that performance that can only be made through accounting for the circumstances of the performance and also the capacities of the performer. In this way, there is a need to understand to competence from both socially shaped and personally constituted perspectives.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent182418 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeDordrechten_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleInternational Perspectives on Competence in the Workplace: Implications for Research, Policy and Practiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom33en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto54en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.titleWorkplace Competence: integrating social and personal perspectivesen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Springer. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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