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dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.editorR McClean, D N Wilson & C Chinienen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:12:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:12:04Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2011-05-12T07:01:43Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781402052804en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4020-5281-1_77en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29181
dc.description.abstractThe teaching profession within the broader sector of Technical, Vocational Education and Training is differentiated by the way in which this educational provision is manifested in a particular country, the institutions within that country, and what purposes it seeks to serve at a particular moment in that country's social and economic development. As a sector of education that is often seen as needing to be highly responsive to changes in the kinds of skills and knowledge that countries require to develop, it has particular cultural impetuses and forms. Not the least of these is the degree to which its purposes are aligned with developing directly the skills required for work by the community or some other educational goal, such as more general competencies associated with the quality of working life. For instance, a longstanding debate within Western countries, but evident in practice elsewhere (e.g., Brazil, China and Russia) is the degree to which vocational education should be focused on developing specific vocational knowledge and skills, or comprise a form of education that has an orientation towards paid vocations. That is, whether workplace competence or general education is its primary educational goal. In other countries, this division of purposes takes particular forms. For instance, as contributors in this collection propose, the emphasis on particular values or ideologies or moral education are to be developed alongside workplace competence in China and Russia, whereas there are requests from Brazilian contributors for a reinstatement of values associated with collective and individual needs.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent74211 bytes
dc.format.extent22278 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeDordrechten_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleInternational Handbook of Education for the Changing World of Worken_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1175en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1184en_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.titleOverview: The Technical and Vocational Education and Training Professionen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB2 - Book Chapters (Non HERDC Eligible)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Springer. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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