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dc.contributor.authorHeadrick, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorD. Lasley, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.editorCN Wilson, J Mustafaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-16T12:30:30Z
dc.date.available2017-05-16T12:30:30Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-24T06:51:18Z
dc.identifier.isbn9783540896142en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-540-89615-9_7en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29336
dc.description.abstractAdenosine, a catabolite of ATP, exerts numerous effects in the heart, including modulation of the cardiac response to stress, such as occurs during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. Over the past 20 years substantial evidence has accumulated that adenosine, administered either prior to ischemia or during reperfusion, reduces both reversible and irreversible myocardial injury. The latter effect results in reduction of both necrosis or myocardial infarction (MI) and apoptosis. These effects appear to be mediated via the activation of one or more G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), referred to as A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes. Experimental studies in different species and models suggest that activation of the A1 or A3ARs prior to ischemia is cardioprotective. Further experimental studies reveal that the administration of A2AAR agonists during reperfusion can also reduce MI, and recent reports suggest that A2BARs may also play an important role in modulating myocardial reperfusion injury. Despite convincing experimental evidence for AR-mediated cardioprotection, there have been only a limited number of clinical trials examining the beneficial effects of adenosine or adenosine-based therapeutics in humans, and the results of these studies have been equivocal. This review summarizes our current knowledge of AR-mediated cardioprotection, and the roles of the four known ARs in experimental models of ischemia-reperfusion. The chapter concludes with an examination of the clinical trials to date assessing the safety and efficacy of adenosine as a cardioprotective agent during coronary thrombolysis in humans.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent388865 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.publisher.placeBerlinen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.springerlink.comen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleHandbook of Experimental Pharmacology, Adenosine Receptors in Health and Diseaseen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom189en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto214en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Pharmacology and Therapeuticsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111502en_US
dc.titleAdenosine receptors and reperfusion injury of the hearten_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Scienceen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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