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dc.contributor.authorDundon, Tony
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Adrian
dc.contributor.editorDavid G. Collings, Geoffrey Wood
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T01:37:32Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T01:37:32Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-06-29T06:44:59Z
dc.identifier.isbn0415462479en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4324/9780203876336en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29475
dc.description.abstractSmall and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) are often deemed critical to the economy of many countries. The reason for this is twofold: first, there are so many smaller firms that they make up a large proportion of employment; secondly, because the way people are managed is regarded as central to the competitive standing of firms and industries (Boxall and Purcell, 2003). Such a recognition has provoked debate about the role of HRM as a means to enhance organisational effectiveness (Den Hartog and Verburg, 2004). What is problematic, however, is that much of the literature that espouses the virtues of HRM is almost exclusively derived from larger firms (Dundon and Wilkinson, 2004). The purpose of this chapter is to assess the nature and extent of HRM among SMEs. We adopt a generalist approach to HRM, which includes employment relations broadly defined . In this way the chapter can report on various practices while providing an analysis about the meanings and interpretations of management action in the context of a smaller rather than larger firm, mostly from a UK perspective. The chapter starts by asking what an SME is, commenting on the importance of SMEs for the economy as a whole and for human resource management specifically. Traditional approaches to HRM are then considered, assessing how they have been applied to smaller businesses. From this it is suggested that much theorising about HRM in SMEs is limited in that analysis often gravitates around one of two polarised perspectives: the ‘small is beautiful’ versus ‘bleak house’ scenario. (Wilkinson 1999).The remainder of the chapter then reviews current research evidence concerning the core dimensions of HRM among SMEs (e.g. informality, recruitment, training, employee involvement /voice and related management practices).en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent12751 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondon, United Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781134042326/chapters/10.4324%2F9780203876336-16en_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleHuman Resource Management. A Critical Approachen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter8en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom130en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto147en_US
dc.relation.ispartofeditionFirsten_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503en_US
dc.titleHRM in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs)en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
dc.description.versionPre-printen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Human Resource Management. A Critical Approach on 19 June 2009, available online: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781134042326en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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