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dc.contributor.convenorCheryl R Babcock
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorFrazer, Lorelle
dc.contributor.authorWeaven, Scott
dc.contributor.editorMark Grunhagen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:58:57Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:58:57Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-08-31T07:48:44Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.huizenga.nova.edu/ExecEd/ISOF/default.cfm
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29499
dc.description.abstractA shortage of suitable franchisee applicants has been identified by franchisors as a major hindrance to franchise sector growth in Australia. However, there has been little investigation into this issue within organisational choice research. This represents an important gap in the literature. In order to explore the issue of franchisee shortage, it was necessary to determine why individuals chose to enter franchising as a franchisee or why they chose to become small independent business operators. Interviews with 10 franchisees and 10 independent small business operators were conducted in Brisbane, Australia. The interviews investigated the characteristics of franchisees and independent small business operators, and looked for differences between the two groups. Whilst their risk profiles were similar, franchisees were less likely to conduct much research prior to making a business choice. Franchisees considered ongoing support, the provision of training and a proven system with established processes to be very important. Alternatively, independent small business operators preferred to exercise absolute control over their businesses, relying on knowledge and skills gained in prior employment and valuing their independence. Franchising appeared to offer the dual benefits of facilitating entry into business in an unfamiliar industry for inexperienced operators as well as providing a vehicle for growth and expansion for investors with previous corporate management experience. Opportunities for franchisors to attract independent business operators include addressing the negative image attached to franchising and demonstrating that the franchise system is not restrictive for entrepreneurs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent98739 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherH. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
dc.publisher.placeflorida
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.business.nova.edu/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename23rd International Society of Franchising Conference
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle2009 International Society of Franchising 23rd Annual Conference Proceedings
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-02-12
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-02-14
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSan Diego
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSmall Business Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150314
dc.titleIs the franchising model attractive to independent small business operators?
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Marketing
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 ISOF. Use hypertext link to access the publisher's website. The attached file is posted here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher, for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorFrazer, Lorelle
gro.griffith.authorWeaven, Scott K.
gro.griffith.authorBennett, Stephen J.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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