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dc.contributor.authorMassey, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorEsain, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Marianneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:00:59Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:00:59Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-06-23T05:25:20Z
dc.identifier.issn00207489en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2007.11.006en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29611
dc.description.abstractBackground: Managing nurse shortages is a major challenge in Trusts today given the worldwide shortage of nurses. To fill the gap created by a lack of permanent staff UK government agencies have increasingly used bank and agency staff. Managing this type of staffing effectively and efficiently, in the context of shrinking healthcare funds, is a major challenge in providing safe and quality healthcare. Objective: To analyse bank and agency nursing staffing patterns and factors that impact on these patterns. Design and setting: Case study within the largest hospital in one Welsh Integrated Healthcare Trust. Data sources: De-identified bank and agency staffing electronic and manual database records and focus group interview with bank and agency office staff. Results: A predictable bank and agency staffing pattern was found, wherein bank and agency nursing staff were used with increasing frequency towards the end of the week. Demand for bank and agency nursing staff occurred because of: hospital practices that fund a fixed staff establishment for nursing units, while patient numbers and acuity are variable; poor forward planning; sickness, and absence due to professional development or staff training. Conclusion: There is a need for managers to reconsider management and recruitment policies, particularly in relation to using bank and agency staff. The complexity of staffing challenges managers to focus on predictability of workload needs and other factors that affect staffing requirements, such as: professional development, flexible working rosters to match the need and minimize sickness and turnover of staff.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom912en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto919en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume46en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003en_US
dc.titleManaging the complexity of nurse shortages: A case study of bank and agency staffing in an acute care Trust in Wales, UKen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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