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dc.contributor.authorPickering, CM
dc.contributor.authorGreen, K
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:21:14Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:21:14Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-05-13T06:40:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0067-1924
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/BT08133
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29654
dc.description.abstractAs part of the Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments program, the relative contribution of abiotic variables in explaining alpine vegetation was determined for five summits on a spur of Mount Clarke in the Snowy Mountains, Australia. The composition of vascular plant species and life-forms, and topography were determined, and soil nutrients and soil temperature were measured on each aspect of each summit by standardised methods. Ordinations were performed on the composition of vascular plant species and life-forms, topography, soil nutrients and soil temperature-derived variables. Abiotic variables were tested against the biotic dissimilarity matrices to determine which were best correlated with current plant composition. Summits differed in plant composition, with a decrease in the cover of shrubs, and an increase in herbs and graminoids with increasing altitude. Altitude was the main determinant of species composition, accounting for more than 80% of the variation among summits. Soil temperature variables accounted for more than 40% of the variation in composition among summits. Soils were not significantly different among summits, although certain soil variables, principally calcium, were important in predicting plant composition. Because temperature is correlated with current vegetation on these five summits, predicted increased temperatures and decreased snow cover are likely to affect future plant composition in this mountain region.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent156637 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.publish.csiro.au/nid/65.htm
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom189
dc.relation.ispartofpageto199
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Botany
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTerrestrial Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPlant Biology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPlant Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060208
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0607
dc.titleVascular plant distribution in relation to topography, soils and micro-climate at five GLORIA sites in the Snowy Mountains, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 CSIRO. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPickering, Catherine M.


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