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dc.contributor.authorChapman, Clinten_US
dc.contributor.authorRenshaw, Gillianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:59:12Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:59:12Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-05-19T06:30:09Z
dc.identifier.issn19325223en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jez.539en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29752
dc.description.abstractWe compared the hematological responses of wild and captive populations of two closely related sharks to a standardized anoxic challenge and during a 12 hr recovery period in normoxia: the epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum, Bonnaterre, 1788) and the grey carpet shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum, Muller and Henle, 1838). Compared to normoxic controls, a significant increase in hematocrit (captive 22.3%; wild 35.9%) coupled with a decline in mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration occurred in epaulette sharks indicating erythrocyte swelling in response to anoxia. However, the grey carpet shark had a significantly increased hematocrit (captive 27.2%; wild 29.3%), erythrocyte count (captive 37.6%; wild 46.3%) and hemoglobin concentration (captive 31.9%; wild 31.5%), suggesting a release of erythrocytes into the circulation and/or hemoconcentration in response to anoxia. Plasma glucose concentrations were maintained in both wild and captive epaulette sharks and in wild grey carpet sharks during anoxia but increased significantly after 2 hr of reoxygenation (epaulette: captive 55.8%; wild 50.1%; grey carpet shark: wild 70.3%) and remained elevated for 12 hr. Captive grey carpet sharks had an immediate increase in plasma glucose concentrations after anoxia (96.4%), which was sustained for 12hr of re-oxygenation. Lactate concentrations significantly increased in captive and wild animals of both species after anoxia, reaching a peak at 2 hr of re-oxygenation. Both species showed significant, yet divergent, hematological changes in response to anoxia and re-oxygenation, which may not only prolong their survival and assist in recovery but also reflect their respective ecophysiological adaptations to the extreme environments that they inhabit.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent1407514 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/114026676/homeen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom422en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto438en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Experimental Zoologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume311Aen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320307en_US
dc.titleHematological responses of the grey carpet shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum) and the epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum) to anoxia and re-oxygenationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Allied Health Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.The definitive version is available at www.interscience.wiley.comen_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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