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dc.contributor.convenorPaul Maginnen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodson, Jagoen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSipe, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.editorMaginn P. J. and Jones R. and Haslam-Mackenzie F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:34:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:34:03Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-13T23:21:03Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://tinyurl.com/yf7mtsnen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29806
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the capacity of suburban households to respond to a changing global energy context by changing their motor vehicle technology. Transforming transport systems will comprise a crucial element in policy and planning responses to energy and climate challenges. Government policy appears focused on a transition to more efficient vehicle types or alternative fuel and engine types. Yet such policies have failed to account for the considerable social differences in household exposure to the costs of transport energy constrain and the adaptability of households in altering their use of modes and vehicle types. Nor do such policies recognise how urban social structure, household social status and automobile types intersect spatially within Australian cities. This paper examines the links between urban social structure and the composition of the motor vehicle fleet to test whether the households that are most reliant on motor vehicles for transport have the financial capacity to rapidly alter their vehicle technology in response to changing energy price and supply conditions. The paper uses ABS Census data and motor vehicle registration data at the postcode level to compare socio-economic status with the age, fuel consumption and value of the suburban vehicle fleet for Brisbane and the Gold Coast. This spatial deployment of Census and vehicle registration data is novel in the Australian context. The paper argues that policies that focus on vehicle technology alone face a number of social equity hurdles as measures to overcome urban transport fuel security problems.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent58687 bytes
dc.format.extent966772 bytes
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Cities and Regions Research Networken_US
dc.publisher.placePerthen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://soac.fbe.unsw.edu.au/2009/Menu.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename4th National Conference on the State of Australian Citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the 4th National Conference on the State of Australian Citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-11-24en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-11-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUWA, Perthen_US
dc.rights.retentionNen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransport Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120599en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120506en_US
dc.titleWheels still in spin?: urban social structure and technological change in Brisbane’s private motor vehicle fleeten_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2009. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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