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dc.contributor.convenorPaul Maginnen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.editorMaginn P. J. and Jones R. and Haslam-Mackenzie F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:19:49Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:19:49Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2012-08-13T22:34:06Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://bit.ly/9uN9UJen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29807
dc.description.abstractIn recent decades outdated noise, planning and liquor laws, encroaching residential development, and the rise of more lucrative forms of entertainment for venue operators, such as poker machines, have acted singly or in combination to close many live music venues in Australia. A set of diverse and quite unique policy and planning initiatives have emerged across Australia's cities responding to these threats. This paper provides the results of a systematic research effort conducted in 2008 into the success or otherwise of these approaches in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. Archival and legislative reviews and field visits were supplemented by interviews with key authorities, venue operators, live music campaigners and others in each city. The research sought to categorise and evaluate the diverse approaches being used and to attempt to understand best ways forward to maintain opportunities for live music performance. In Brisbane a place-based approach designating 'Entertainment Precincts' has been used, re-writing separate pieces of legislation (across planning, noise and liquor law). Resulting in monopolies for the few venue operators within the precincts, outside the threats remain and venues continue to be lost. Melbourne instead liberalised liquor licensing, resulting in a profusion of small bars, many of which have provided for live music performance. And Sydney, where perhaps the situation was most acute, undertook a review of NSW liquor laws in late 2008, seeking to find solutions. The paper explores these efforts, and points to ways forward for improved urban management.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent43205 bytes
dc.format.extent166496 bytes
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMaginn P. J. (University of Western Australia), and Jones R. and Haslam-Mackenzie F. (Curtin Universen_US
dc.publisher.placePerthen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://soac.fbe.unsw.edu.au/2009/Menu.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameState of Australian Citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of 4th National Conference on the State of Australian Citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-11-24en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-11-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUWA, Perthen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLand Use and Environmental Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120504en_US
dc.titleThe Death and Life of Great Australian Music: planning for live music venues in Australian Citiesen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2009. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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