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dc.contributor.authorVivanti, Angela P
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Cameron K
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Michelle A
dc.contributor.authorSinnott, Michael
dc.contributor.editorAnthony F.T. Brown
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:29:49Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:29:49Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-10-13T09:59:24Z
dc.identifier.issn1742-6731
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1742-6723.2009.01223.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29822
dc.description.abstractObjective: To identify associations between malnutrition falls risk and hospital admission among older people presenting to ED. Methods: A prospective convenience sample of patients, aged 60 years or more, presenting to an Australian tertiary teaching hospital ED were included in this cross-sectional study. Malnutrition Screening Tool and Subjective Global Assessment tool were administered to 126 non-consecutive participants. Participants were categorized as non-fallers, frail mechanical or active mechanical fallers. Self-reported falls in past 6 months and hospital admission were documented. Results: Participant age and sex (median age 74, interquartile range 65-82 years; male 59%, 74/126, 95% CI 50-67%) were representative of older people presenting to the ED. Malnutrition prevalence was 15% (19/126, 95% CI 9-21%). There was an increased risk of being assessed as malnourished when a frail mechanical faller relative to: a non-faller (relative risk [RR]: 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.3, P= 0.001), an active mechanical faller (RR: 3.1, 95% CI 1.0-10.9, Fisher's Exact test P= 0.02) or a non-faller and active mechanical faller combined (RR: 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1, P= 0.001). Malnourished participants had an increased risk of self-reported falls over 6 months (RR: 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.5, P= 0.03). There was over five times the risk of hospital admission if malnourished than if well-nourished (RR: 5.3, 95% CI 1.4-20.0, Fisher's exact test P= 0.001). The Malnutrition Screening Tool captured 84% (16/19, 95% CI 78-92%) of participants assessed as malnourished by Subjective Global Assessment. Conclusions: Older people presenting to ED should be nutritionally screened. Malnutrition prevalence of 15% was documented and was associated with an increased risk of frail mechanical falls and hospital admission. The Malnutrition Screening Tool was a simple and practical screen for ED.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent185076 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1742-6731
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom386
dc.relation.ispartofpageto394
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.rights.retentionN
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleMalnutrition associated with increased risk of frail mechanical falls among older people presenting to an emergency department
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 ACEM and ASEM. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMcDonald, Cam
gro.griffith.authorPalmer, Michelle A.


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