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dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, Justin J
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:04:55Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:04:55Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-05-31T06:53:31Z
dc.identifier.issn1743-0003
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1743-0003-6-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29901
dc.description.abstractBackground There is a limited understanding about how gait speed influences the control of upper body motion during walking. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to examine how gait speed influences healthy individual's lower trunk motion during overground walking. The secondary purpose was to assess if Principal Component Analysis (PCA) can be used to gain further insight into postural responses that occur at different walking speeds. Methods Thirteen healthy subjects (23 ᠳ years) performed 5 straight-line walking trials at self selected slow, preferred, and fast walking speeds. Accelerations of the lower trunk were measured in the anterior-posterior (AP), vertical (VT), and mediolateral (ML) directions using a triaxial accelerometer. Stride-to-stride acceleration amplitude, regularity and repeatability were examined with RMS acceleration, Approximate Entropy and Coefficient of Multiple determination respectively. Coupling between acceleration directions were calculated using Cross Approximate Entropy. PCA was used to reveal the dimensionality of trunk accelerations during walking at slow and preferred speeds, and preferred and fast speeds. Results RMS acceleration amplitude increased with gait speed in all directions. ML and VT trunk accelerations had less signal regularity and repeatability during the slow compared to preferred speed. However, stride-to-stride acceleration regularity and repeatability did not differ between the preferred and fast walking speed conditions, partly due to an increase in coupling between frontal plane accelerations. The percentage of variance accounted for by each trunk acceleration Principal Component (PC) did not differ between grouped slow and preferred, and preferred and fast walking speed acceleration data. Conclusion The main finding of this study was that walking at speeds slower than preferred primarily alters lower trunk accelerations in the frontal plane. Despite greater amplitudes of trunk acceleration at fast speeds, the lack of regularity and repeatability differences between preferred and fast speeds suggest that features of trunk motion are preserved between the same conditions. While PCA indicated that features of trunk motion are preserved between slow and preferred, and preferred and fast speeds, the discriminatory ability of PCA to detect speed-dependent differences in walking patterns is limited compared to measures of signal regularity, repeatability, and coupling.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent383606 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto10
dc.relation.ispartofissue9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMotor Control
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical Engineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110603
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0903
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.titleLower trunk motion and speed-dependence during walking
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 Kavanagh; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKavanagh, Justin J.


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