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dc.contributor.convenorDr. Cameron Allenen_AU
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Georginaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeetz, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.editorProfessor Bradley Bowden & Dr Cameron Allenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:48:51Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:48:51Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-06-01T06:53:18Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/29946
dc.description.abstractThe first handful of women began working in Queensland coal mines in 1979, as labourers, in what was seen by some as a public relations exercise rather than a genuine willingness to embrace equal opportunity. Our paper reports on the changing situation of women miners since this period, based on interviews of 22 of these women mining workers recorded between 2006 and 2009. Some women became miners because of the money, some did it because they could not survive in the city on working women's wages with children, some did it because their fathers, grandfathers and brothers were in the mines first and lit their way; others did it because they were left stranded by divorce and separations in company towns. Today women can be found in all mining positions: from the wash plants through to drag lines, from driving trucks that carry up to three hundred tonnes of dirt in open cut mines to the few working underground. Some believe the enthusiasm of certain mining companies for women workers is part of an effort to change, undermine, or avoid the union culture of mines. But women still represent only a small portion of the workforce. They have supported unions whilst resisting the legacy of a traditional, masculine industry culture, and confronted the slowness of organisations and individuals to adapt to change. Even amongst women, views are divided as to whether women should work in the mines. There are stories from some women who adapted fairly quickly to work on the mines - or who made the mines adapt to them. There are other stories of harassment and remarkable stories of persistence and bravery in the face of major obstacles.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent106618 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherDepartment of Justice and Attorney-Generalen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.justice.qld.gov.au/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameHistory of labour relations in Queensland from 1859 to 2009 Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleThe history of labour relations in Queensland from 1859 to 2009 Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-12-11en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-12-11en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban Sociology and Community Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFeminist Theoryen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160810en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode220306en_US
dc.title‘There was some hard times in there': women in the Queensland coal minesen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2009. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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