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dc.contributor.authorPrenzler, Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.editorKieren Tranteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:04:38Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:04:38Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2013-10-27T21:55:33Z
dc.identifier.issn10383441en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30038
dc.description.abstractThis article reviews the main recommendations and reforms emanating from the 1989 Fitzgerald Inquiry in Queensland. The ups and downs of the reform process are chronicled under the three headings of 'politics', 'criminal justice' and 'police'. In politics, there has been a retreat from Fitzgerald's vision for integrity in government, evidenced by bias in the electoral system, the failure to establish transparency in government decision-making, violations of appointment by merit, and the politicisation of policing. In criminal justice, major hypocrisies and inefficiencies remain in the operation of the law, with a regressive approach to crime reduction through over-reliance on imprisonment. In policing, the Fitzgerald vision for community policing was never implemented at the local level, and the pre-Fitzgerald model of police investigating police remains dominant. The article is focused on describing the nature and extent of the subversion of reform, with some reference to two contributing factors. The first is the gap between the general principles articulated in the Fitzgerald Report and the specific wording of its recommendations. The second concerns the power culture of the Australian Labor Party, whose winner-takes-all philosophy has triumphed over participatory democracy.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent318737 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGriffith University, Socio-Legal Research Centreen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/criminology-law/griffith-law-review/previous-issues/volumes-12-19/volume1832009en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom576en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto595en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGriffith Law Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolice Administration, Procedures and Practiceen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160205en_US
dc.titleReform in Politics, Criminal Justice and the Police in Post-Fitzgerald Queensland: An Assessmenten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Griffith Law School. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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