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dc.contributor.authorM. Meyers, Noelen_US
dc.contributor.authorNulty, Duncanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:51:45Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:51:45Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2011-04-06T05:32:36Z
dc.identifier.issn1469-297Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02602930802226502en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30062
dc.description.abstractIn this article, we articulate five principles of curriculum design and illustrate their application in a third-year undergraduate course for environmental and ecological scientists. In this way, we provide a practical framework for others wishing to enhance their students' learning. To apply the five principles, we created a learning environment consisting of a broad range of learning resources and activities which were structured and sequenced with an integrated assessment strategy. The combined effect of this ensured alignment between the learning environment we created, the thinking approaches students used and the learning outcomes they achieved. More specifically, the assessment activities guided students by requiring them to recognise when their understanding was limited - and then to engage them in thinking approaches that would develop their understanding further. By providing a framework of thoughts, ideas and information, we sought to progressively enhance the sophistication of our learners' thinking. Thus, the assessment required students to integrate, synthesise and construct their understandings in ways consistent with the discipline and the professional pathways on which they had embarked. We intend that this illustration will act as a guide to other academics to adopt the same principles in their teaching.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent88941 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom565en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto577en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Assessment and Evaluationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130303en_US
dc.titleHow to use (five) curriculum design principles to align authentic learning environments, assessment, students' approaches to thinking and learning outcomesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, Volume 34, Issue 5, Pages 565 - 577 . Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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