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dc.contributor.authorSharman, Jasonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:21:07Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:21:07Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-04T02:37:11Z
dc.identifier.issn09692290en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09692290802403502en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30215
dc.description.abstractThis article argues that public blacklisting by international organizations can be an effective means of bringing about compliance in otherwise recalcitrant states. This contention is examined in light of overlapping campaigns by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and the Financial Action Task Force to pressure targeted states to adopt costly financial reforms. In a constructivist vein, blacklisting is held to be a form of speech act that changed the world by damaging states' reputations among investors, and thus produced pressure to comply through actual or anticipated capital flight. To be removed from blacklists, thereby preventing future economic damage, those targeted have had to comply with stringent regulatory standardsmandated by these international organizations. Evidence is taken from interviews, press accounts, official documents and quantitative data relating to seven affected tax havens as well as Austria and Switzerland.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent134919 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom573en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto596en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalReview of International Political Economyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleThe bark is the bite: International organizations and blacklistingen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Review of International Political Economy Volume 16, Issue 4 October 2009 , pages 573 - 596. Review of International Political Economy is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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