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dc.contributor.authorSellers, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKebbell, Marken_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:28:01Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:28:01Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-10-12T06:56:20Z
dc.identifier.issn15444767en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jip.95en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30256
dc.description.abstractThe question of whether to disclose evidence to a suspect early on, or later, in an interview is often of critical importance for police offi cers' interviewing strategies. To shed light on this issue, an experiment was conducted in which 95 participants each committed a mocktheft as a hidden 'witness' observed them. A statement from the witness was presented to them during a subsequent interview in which they were 'suspects'. The time at which this evidence was disclosed to participants, and the evidence strength, was manipulated. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of four conditions; Early Weak, Early Strong, Late Weak, or Late Strong. Both late evidence disclosure, and strong evidence, produced higher confession rates than did early disclosure or weak evidence, and late disclosure of weak evidence resulted in the withdrawal of most of the confessions which had previously been made.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent78681 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom151en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto160en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profilingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchForensic Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170104en_US
dc.titleWhen Should Evidence be Disclosed in an Interview with a Suspect? An Experiment with Mock-Suspectsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling Volume 6, Issue 2, pages 151–160, June 2009, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jip.95en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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