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dc.contributor.authorSammel, Alisonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:29:17Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:29:17Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-07T07:40:05Z
dc.identifier.issn18711502en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11422-009-9184-7en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30293
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides another way to gaze upon Brad's story as presented by van Eijck and Roth (2010). It raises questions about infrastructural racism in contemporary science education by exploring its association with Whiteness and White privilege. To explore the racial positioning inherent in Western science education specific attention is given to the positions of power that accompany Western ways of knowing the world (i.e., science education) in comparison to Other ways of knowing the world (i.e., First Nations Ways of Knowing). The paper suggests the power relationships inherent within this dualism are asymmetrical due to the implications of Whiteness within colonial societies. Even though power relations were not discussed in Brad's story, the paper suggests the implications were visible. The paper concludes by advocating for a re-imagining in science education where the traditional ontological and epistemological foundations are deconstructed and spaces are created for enacting practical ways of resisting oppression.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom649en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto656en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCultural Studies of Science Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchScience, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130212en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330203en_US
dc.titleTurning the focus from 'other' to science education: Exploring the invisibility of whitenessen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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