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dc.contributor.authorHäkkänen, Helinäen_US
dc.contributor.authorAsk, Karlen_US
dc.contributor.authorKebbell, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorAlison, Laurenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorGranhag, Pär Andersen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:28:02Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:28:02Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-17T05:03:18Z
dc.identifier.issn08884080en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/acp.1491en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30300
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the effects of case-specific facts and individual discomfort with ambiguity (DA) on investigators' beliefs concerning effective interviewing tactics for suspects. Violent crime investigators (n쳰) responded to a questionnaire including the Need for Closure Scale (NFCS) and ratings of the importance of 39 interrogation tactics in two hypothetical interrogations with a homicide suspect, where the evidence consisted of either technical evidence or soft information. Twenty tactics were analysed with a multidimensional scaling procedure which confirmed two discrete interviewing themes: humane and dominant. More tactics, both dominant and humane, were rated as important if the evidence was soft compared with technical. In the soft evidence condition, investigators who were high on DA rated both types of tactics as more important than did low-DA investigators. In the technical evidence condition, no such difference emerged.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent440116 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom468en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto481en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalApplied Cognitive Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchForensic Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170104en_US
dc.titlePolice officers' views of effective interview tactics with suspects: The effects of weight of case evidence and discomfort with ambiguityen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Police officers' views of effective interview tactics with suspects: The effects of weight of case evidence and discomfort with ambiguity, Applied Cognitive Psychology, Volume 23, Issue 4, pages 468–481, May 2009, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1491en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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