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dc.contributor.authorSharman, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.editorR.A.W. Rhodesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:21:08Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:21:08Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-23T07:02:27Z
dc.identifier.issn00333298en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9299.2009.01785.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30564
dc.description.abstractA fundamental shift has occurred in the relationship between the state and the individual regarding financial privacy. The onus is now on citizens to show why governments should not have access to their personal financial information, rather than governments having to show why they should. This article argues that this shift has come about in large part because of the activities of autonomous and influential transnational networks of regulators. These regulatory networks have systematically favoured administrative efficiency and transparency at the expense of privacy in designing responses to financial crimes. Evidence is drawn from an examination of recent policy developments in countering tax evasion, money laundering, and the financing of terrorism. Currently, the principle of financial transparency suggests that financial privacy inhibits the fight against criminals and terrorists; by extension, asserting a right to privacy indicates some kind of roguery afoot.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent1384837 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom717en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto731en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPublic Administrationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume87en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchComparative Government and Politicsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160603en_US
dc.titlePrivacy as roguery: Personal financial information in an age of transparencyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Blackwell Publishing. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Public Administration Volume 87 Issue 4, Pages 717 - 731, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9299.2009.01785.xen_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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