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dc.contributor.authorGardner, Roden_US
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorMushin, Ilanaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:24:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:24:03Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2014-01-30T22:34:11Z
dc.identifier.issn08116202en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30624
dc.description.abstractThe 1974 paper 'Simplest systematics for the organization of turn taking in conversation', by Sacks, Schegloff, and Jefferson, is widely regarded as groundbreaking for its detailed and methodical understanding of the routine methods of turn taking in conversation. However, these findings also raise questions of what role, if any, a broader sociocultural context of the talk may play in organising social behaviour, and whether different kinds of orderliness, or even a different turntaking machinery, may be managed and attended to according to different social or cultural conventions. In this paper, we provide examples from a range of Australian face-to-face conversations that show that, even in talk involving extended overlap or extended gaps, the same foundational principles of order in turn-taking apply. From this evidence, we suggest that variations in length and proliferation of gaps and overlaps are not symptomatic of different turn-taking machinery, but rather are contingent on contextual and situational factors.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent930390 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Queenslanden_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=201002705;res=APAFTen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom65en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto89en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Communicationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume36en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLanguage, Communication and Culture not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode209999en_US
dc.titleThe underlying orderliness of turn-taking: Examples from Australian talken_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/en_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2009. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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