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dc.contributor.authorLin, Jin-Dingen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Pei-Yingen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Lan-Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Shang-Weien_US
dc.contributor.authorYen, Chia-Fengen_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Wen-Huien_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Sheng-Ruen_US
dc.contributor.authorChien, Wu-Chienen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoh, Ching-Huien_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, Cordiaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:08:18Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:08:18Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-06-24T05:22:30Z
dc.identifier.issn08914222en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ridd.2009.07.008en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30668
dc.description.abstractThe aims of the preset study were to describe the profile of serum uric acid, the prevalence of hyperuricemia and its risk factors among children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 941 children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (aged 4-18 years) who participated in annual health examinations in three special schools in Taiwan. This study indicated 30.6% boys and 17.9% girls with intellectual disabilities were with hyperuricemia in Taiwan. The factors of gender, age and BMI were variables that can significantly predict the hyperuricemia occurrence in this vulnerable population. Those children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities were boys (OR = 2.93, 95% CI = 2.02-4.26) and older age (OR = 6.49, 95% CI = 2.19-19.21) were more likely to be hyperuricemia. With regard to BMI to hyperuricemia occurrence, those children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities were overweight (OR = 1.16-3.21, 95% CI = 1.16-3.21) and being obese (OR = 4.95-11.58, 95% CI = 4.95- 11.58) was more likely to have a hyperuricemia than the normal weight group. This study provides the general profile of serum uric acid, hyperuricemia and its risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Medical professionals should be highly alert to the possible consequences of hyperuricemia and provide useful information about the clinical manifestation of this condition for caregivers of children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1481en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1489en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalResearch in Developmental Disabilitiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume30en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321202en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321212en_US
dc.titleSerum uric acid, hyperuricemia and body mass index in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilitiesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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