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dc.contributor.authorLeusch, Fredericen_US
dc.contributor.authorR. Moore, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Heatheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:24:06Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:24:06Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-06-24T05:19:06Z
dc.identifier.issn02731223en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/wst.2009.398en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/30949
dc.description.abstractEstrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds (e-EDCs) are present in treated sewage and there is concern about estrogenicity of potable recycled water. However e-EDCs are also present in other environmental media and intake from water needs to be considered in relation to these other sources. The concentrations of 13 e-EDCs in foodstuffs and drinking water are reviewed, their predicted concentrations in recycled water are estimated, and the daily estrogenic intake as 17b-estradiol equivalent (EEq) based on both in vitro and in vivo potencies is calculated as 1.39 and 9.65mg EEq/d, respectively. Dietary intake accounts for more than 99.8% of that total, and more than 84.2% is due to phytosterols. Drinking 2 L of recycled water per day is expected to add 0.001 to 0.016mg EEq/d based on in vitro and in vivo potencies, respectively. Exposure to e-EDCs in recycled water is therefore likely to be insignificant compared to current dietary intakes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherIWA Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.iwaponline.com/wst/default.htmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1003en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1012en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWater Science and Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume60en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050299en_US
dc.titleBalancing the budget of environmental estrogen exposure: the contribution of recycled wateren_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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