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dc.contributor.convenorNick Harknessen_AU
dc.contributor.authorPeacock-Smith, Robynen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen-Armytage, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.editorD. Smith, P. Green-Armytage, M. Pope, N Harknessen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:13:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:13:43Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-12T06:39:31Z
dc.identifier.refuriwww.aic2009.orgen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/31437
dc.description.abstractThis paper is the outcome of a dialogue between two lecturers in the visual arts from universities in Queensland and Western Australia. The Colour Card Game is a tool for teaching creative colour exploration to a wide variety of students from different educational disciplines and from different cultural backgrounds. The aim is to engage students in a way that is not intimidating, requires no special skills or preparation, and with any value judgements coming from the students rather than from the teacher. The game is played with commercial paint sample cards that are freely available from paint and hardware stores. The object of the game is to produce unusual colour combinations that 'work' (are considered creatively harmonious). There is an element of chance in the distribution of colour cards, and opportunities for players to exchange cards that they find unworkable. At the conclusion of play the colour combinations are displayed and players vote for the ones they consider most successful. The game provides the opportunity to discuss different approaches to colour combination: reliance on one's own judgement, application of established theories of colour harmony, making use of the findings of research and using chance processes to open up a wider range of possibilities. Students learn to look at colours with fresh eyes and to escape from personal limitations, prejudices, rules and the dictates of fashion. They explore unfamiliar areas of colour space and discover how colours actually interact. The game has been played successfully in the classroom and in social situations.Players enjoy the game; they find it challenging, stimulating and often revealing of personal tastes in colour. The paper describes the game's development, purposes and applications within the teaching context, variations of play and possible future developments. Keywords: colour education, colour games, chance, colour interaction, creative colour combinationsen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent202778 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Walesen_US
dc.publisher.placeSydney, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.aic-color.org/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAIC 2009: 11th International Congress of the International Colour Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle11th Congress of the International Colour Association (AIC) 2009: Proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-09-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-10-02en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUniversty of NSW, Sydneyen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCreative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130201en_US
dc.titleThe Colour Card Gameen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland College of Arten_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 CSA. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link for access to conference website.en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPeacock-Smith, Robyn


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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